Accommodation in Blue Mountains





Accommodation in Blue Mountains

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A Beginner's Guide To Water Gardens

RRP $16.99

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A Beginner's Guide to Water Gardens Table of Contents Introduction Growing Plants in Your Water Garden Siting Your Pool Formal and Informal Water Gardens Shallow Pools or Deep Pools? Different Types of Pools Concrete Pools How to Make Your Own Pond Prefabricated Pools Miscellaneous Containers Polythene Sheeting Stream Gardens Bog Gardens Using a Tub as a Water Garden Planting in Containers Winter Care of Pools Planting Your Pools No Organic Materials! Growing Water Lilies Maintenance and Care Cleaning Your Pond Planting Aquatic Plants Planting Oxygenators Best Planting Time Livestock in Your Pool Discolored Water Suggested Plants for Your Pool Conclusion Author Bio Publisher Introduction I was talking about gardening with a friend, who is an avid gardener, when we got onto the topic of water Gardens. Her immediate reaction was "how do you make a water garden in a limited space, especially in congested cities. Water gardens are only for those houses built in really wide-open spaces, and plenty of land where you can go high, wide and free, making a water garden." Unfortunately, that is the mindset of a number of people out there, who are under the impression that you need plenty of land in which to make a water garden. That is because the moment you say this word water garden, you visualize a huge pool, in which a number of exotic plant species float. You may also find some Koi goldfish moving leisurely to and fro, and people appreciating that garden while walking around it leisurely of an evening. Well, that may be all right for a hotel lobby, where no expenses are spared. However, ordinary water gardens can be made right in your back yard, in the limited space, and with a little bit of creative gardening. I told my friend that a water garden could be made in the amount of space, in which she wanted to erect a water fountain, and she blinked. What is the fun of a small water garden was her immediate response. I replied, "Just think about it. After all, you are planting some attractive plant species which are growing in water. This is a contrast to the plants growing on land. You do not have any kids, and you do not have any pets which may find them taking a ducking in that water garden. So think about it. " She did. And now she has a small water garden in her backyard. It has water lilies and lotuses goldfish and even tadpoles in it. Also a Walt Disney statue of Snow white's pal Dopey looking at his reflection in his typical dopey fashion. The idea of water gardening is definitely not a modern concept. Since millenniums, water gardens have been a part of garden layouts. Be they the palaces of Caesar, in Greece, or a castle in Spain, or a manor in Britain or perhaps the palace of Kublai Khan, you could be certain that there would be a water garden built there, and tended carefully and lovingly by all the gardeners.


A Cultural History Of Gardens

RRP $401.99

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Cultural History of Gardens presents an authoritative survey from ancient times to the present. This set of six volumes covers over 2500 years of gardens as physical, social and artistic spaces.

1. A Cultural History of Gardens in Antiquity
2. A Cultural History of Gardens in the Medieval Age
3. A Cultural History of Gardens in the Renaissance
4. A Cultural History of Gardens in the Age of Enlightenment
5. A Cultural History of Gardens in the Age of Empire
6. A Cultural History of Gardens in the Modern Age

Each volume discusses the same themes in its chapters:
1. Design
2. Types of Gardens
3. Planting
4. Use and Reception
5. Meaning
6. Verbal Representations
7. Visual Representations
8. Gardens and the Larger Landscape

This structure means readers can either have a broad overview of a period by reading a volume or follow a theme through history by reading the relevant chapter in each volume.

Superbly illustrated, the full six volume set combines to present the most authoritative and comprehensive survey available on gardens through history.


A Beginner's Guide To Rock Gardens

RRP $16.99

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Table of Contents A Beginner's Guide to Rock Gardens Introduction Wrong Way Of Placing Rocks The Right Way to Place Rock Stones Good Rock Work- Flat Ground Wall Stones on Slopes Choosing the Best Soil Building Your Rock Garden Planting Your Rock Plants Maintenance Conifers Bulbs List of Rock Plants, depending on the Particular Conditions and Places Rock Plants For Walls Crazy paving plants - Conclusion Author Bio Publisher Introduction Rock gardens have been part of landscaping and gardening lore for millenniums. In the East Japanese rock gardens or Zen gardens have been places where people could meditate in serene and harmonious surroundings. Why are more people designing their own gardens incorporating at least one rock garden in the design? Even if the rock garden is quite small, it is going to add a touch of distinction to the landscaping of your garden. In Japan, rock gardens were normally built as dry landscape gardens, where a number of landscapes were made up of natural compositions made from natural products incorporated into a landscape. These natural items included bushes, trees, Moss, water, rocks and sand. One believes that the concept of rock gardening originated in China, especially when the ancient religion of Shintoism spoke about places of harmony where one could commune with nature and the spirit in serenity. These were normally made in monasteries, where they could be seen from one focal point, like say the porch of the head priest of the monastery. These dry Landscape gardens which you call a Zen garden in Japan were built to be seen from one viewpoint, with the walling closed around it in ancient times. Nowadays they stretch on for miles incorporating all the natural features available and present in the area to make up harmonious surroundings. Japanese Zen gardens go back to 784 BC. Chinese gardens have been around for even longer. The incorporation of gravel and white sand in a Zen or rock garden was an important feature. These were the symbol of distance, emptiness, purity, white space and water. All these symbols were supposed to aid in meditation. White sand and gravel used harmoniously together were also used around temples, shrines and palaces.



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